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KJV is Hard to Read. THAT’S NOT A GOOD EXCUSE

It is essential to demand a perfect word of God. As Bible believers, we believe it is the King James Bible. If we do not believe in a perfect word of God, we will be unsure as to whether or not a verse means what it says. This confuses people in determining the correct doctrine and where one questions if their Christian faith is correct. 

A common criticism against the KJV is that it is difficult to read. If we recall our first time reading a KJV, we can say that it was difficult. Because it is difficult to understand, some use this as an excuse to turn toward modern versions. However, this is unwise since it gives us an excuse to sin with the claim that the KJV is not understandable or clear. Sin is not justifiable in any context, and modern bibles present the wrong doctrine, leading to sin. We should avoid modern Bibles.

Mark 9:30 And they departed thence, and passed through Galilee; and he would not that any man should know it. For he taught his disciples, and said unto them, The Son of man is delivered into the hands of men, and they shall kill him; and after that he is killed, he shall rise the third day. But they understood not that saying, and were afraid to ask him.

Taking a look at the passage above, let us assume Jesus spoke plainly to the disciples in their language. Even though they understood Jesus, it was still difficult to understand what he meant when speaking to the disciples. The point is that even if God spoke to anyone in their native language, especially those that are starting out in their faith, that person would still have trouble understanding or rather comprehending some things that God was saying.

And they departed thence, and passed through Galilee; and he would not that any man should know it.  For he taught his disciples, and said unto them, The Son of man is delivered into the hands of men, and they shall kill him; and after that he is killed, he shall rise the third day.

These verses are pretty plain, detailing how human beings will crucify Jesus and that he will raise himself from the dead.

But they understood not that saying, and were afraid to ask him.

However, the disciples did not understand what Jesus meant, despite speaking in their language.

Now, let us assume that God speaks directly to one of us via vision revelation. If we are honest, we still would not understand what we saw. Take Daniel, for instance.

Daniel 12:4-5,7-8 But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased. Then I Daniel looked, and, behold, there stood other two, the one on this side of the bank of the river, and the other on that side of the bank of the river. And I heard the man clothed in linen, which was upon the waters of the river, when he held up his right hand and his left hand unto heaven, and sware by him that liveth for ever that it shall be for a time, times, and an half; and when he shall have accomplished to scatter the power of the holy people, all these things shall be finished.  And I heard, but I understood not: then said I, O my Lord, what shall be the end of these things?

Even Daniel had a difficult time understanding God’s revelation!

The point here is that the words of God are difficult, period. We overcome this difficulty in understanding by growing spiritually. We grow spiritually by hearing the teaching and preaching of our pastor, using other doctrinally sound resources, and reading the KJV repeatedly so we can get used to the language, thus making it easier to understand. If you take a difficult book and read it over and over, you are going to understand more of it than the first time you read it. This is common knowledge/practice when reading something difficult: you read it until you understand. Then, when you have grown spiritually from how many times you read the KJV, a lot of the language will become common sense.

1 Corinthians 2:12-14 Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual. But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.

Now we have received, not the spirit of the world,

Because we live in this world, we are used to the world’s communication/language. When reading God’s word, a Christian should not apply a worldly understanding/communication to God’s word because it will not make sense to them.

but the spirit which is of God;

This contrasts the spirit of the world previously mentioned.

that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God.

And this is how we gain understanding (of God’s word), by God’s spirit who gives understanding.

Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth

In other words, we do not need modern Bible scholars to give us more accessible English to understand the word of God. That is not how God operates.

but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual. But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.

The only way we can truly understand God’s word is through spiritual discernment given to us by the Holy Ghost inside us. This happens with spiritual growth, and when that happens, you’ll understand the KJV in its simplicity.

Ecclesiastes 8:4 Where the word of a king is, there is power: and who may say unto him, What doest thou?

We should ask why God gave us the King James Bibles in Elizabethan English to read and not the English of today? The answer is in Ecclesiastes, where it says:

Where the word of a king is, there is power

King James Version. God’s word is found in a king.

Who is our King of Kings?

God Almighty.

His word has authority and power, so it makes sense that His perfect word would be written in an English form that would exude authority and power, unlike today’s modern English. The difference in power and authority is apparent between the KJV and modern Bible versions.

This is why people curse with the word ‘Hell” instead of “Hades” and take Jesus’ name in vain, among other things. They know that it exudes authority, whether consciously or not. Modern Bibles replace Jesus’ name to diminish His authority while unbelievers mock Christians with “thee” and “thou” because they recognize that they are authoritative for the Christian faith.

The point is that God gave us a King James Bible with Elizabethan English for a reason; He wants to provide us with the best authoritative kind of English in existence. English scholars recognize Elizabethan English as authoritative as well, so why can’t believers?

1 Samuel 9:6-11 And he said unto him, Behold now, there is in this city a man of God, and he is an honourable man; all that he saith cometh surely to pass: now let us go thither; peradventure he can shew us our way that we should go. Then said Saul to his servant, But, behold, if we go, what shall we bring the man? for the bread is spent in our vessels, and there is not a present to bring to the man of God: what have we? And the servant answered Saul again, and said, Behold, I have here at hand the fourth part of a shekel of silver: that will I give to the man of God, to tell us our way.  (Beforetime in Israel, when a man went to enquire of God, thus he spake, Come, and let us go to the seer: for he that is now called a Prophet was beforetime called a Seer.) Then said Saul to his servant, Well said; come, let us go. So they went unto the city where the man of God was. And as they went up the hill to the city, they found young maidens going out to draw water, and said unto them, Is the seer here?

This passage gives us insight into what people of King Saul’s time thought about archaic language or how they reacted to its use.

(Beforetime in Israel, when a man went to enquire of God, thus he spake, Come, and let us go to the seer: for he that is now called a Prophet was beforetime called a Seer.)

We establish that the current word is ‘Prophet’ and the archaic word is ‘Seer’.

And as they went up the hill to the city, they found young maidens going out to draw water, and said unto them, Is the seer here?

King Saul himself did not make a big deal out of archaic language because he and his company both used the archaic word ‘Seer’ when enquiring about a Prophet. If the Bible doesn’t make a deal out of archaic words, then we shouldn’t either.

 

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